Stanford’s Method for Inferring Haplotype Phase is Not Patent EligibleStanford University applied for a U.S. patent for statistical methods of predicting haplotype phase. In 2019, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board rejected the application as ineligible subject matter. Last week, a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed.

The opinion is interesting for being related to two, often

An Early Out Under § 101 Based on Claimed Long-standing Commercial PracticesLate last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit delivered ShoppersChoice.com the affirmation it ordered in Electronic Communication Technologies, LLC (ECT) v. ShoppersChoice.com, LLC. In doing so, the court supplied accused infringers with a helpful example of what may be appropriate for early dismissal under 35 U.S.C. § 101. In addition,

Done at Step 1: When a Claim Is Tied to an Improvement, No Need to Proceed to Alice Step 2By reversing the lower court’s ruling that the asserted claims were not patent-eligible under 35 U.S.C. §  101 in Uniloc v. LG Electronics, the Federal Circuit resurrected Uniloc’s infringement suit against LG Electronics. It also demonstrated what we already know — courts have been inconsistent in their application of the Alice/Mayo test. Nevertheless, this